The Battle of Peach Tree Creek: Hood’s First Effort to Save Atlanta Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - Hess describes how several confederate regiments and brigades made a pretense of advancing but then stopped partway to the objective and took cover for the rest of the afternoon on July 20 Offering new and definitive interpretations of the battle's place within the Atlanta campaign, Earl J. Attacking northward from Atlanta's defenses, Hood's men struck George H.

On july 20, 1864, the civil War struggle for Atlanta reached a pivotal moment. North carolina. As william T. Johnston and elevating John Bell Hood. Thomas's army of the cumberland just after it crossed Peach Tree Creek on July 20 As a result, the Federals achieved a remarkable defensive victory. Initially taken by surprise, the Federals fought back with spirit and nullified all the advantages the Confederates first enjoyed.

The Battle of Peach Tree Creek: Hood's First Effort to Save Atlanta Civil War America #ad - Sherman's union forces came ever nearer the city, the defending Confederate Army of Tennessee replaced its commanding general, removing Joseph E. This decision stunned and demoralized Confederate troops just when Hood was compelled to take the offensive against the approaching Federals. Hess shows that morale played an unusually important role in determining the outcome at Peach Tree Creek--a soured mood among the Confederates and overwhelming confidence among the Federals spelled disaster for one side and victory for the other.

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The Battle of Ezra Church and the Struggle for Atlanta Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - Lee nearly overwhelmed the Union right flank, but Federals under General Oliver O. Detailing lee's tactical missteps and Howard's vigilant leadership, he challenges many common misconceptions about the battle. Richly narrated and drawn from an array of unpublished manuscripts and firsthand accounts, Hess's work sheds new light on the complexities and significance of this important engagement, both on and off the battlefield.

After five hours of struggle, 000 Confederates lay dead and wounded, 5, while only 632 Federals were lost. Sherman's advancing armies as they tried to cut the last Confederate supply line into the city. Confederate forces under John Bell Hood desperately fought to stop William T. Howard decisively repelled every attack.

The Battle of Ezra Church and the Struggle for Atlanta Civil War America #ad - University of North Carolina Press. The result was another major step in Sherman's long effort to take Atlanta. Hess's compelling study is the first book-length account of the fighting at Ezra Church. Confederates under General Stephen D. Fought on july 28, 1864, the battle of Ezra Church was a dramatic engagement during the Civil War's Atlanta campaign.

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Fighting for Atlanta: Tactics, Terrain, and Trenches in the Civil War Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - University of North Carolina Press. As william T. Sherman's union troops began their campaign for Atlanta in the spring of 1864, they encountered Confederate forces employing field fortifications located to take advantage of rugged terrain. The atlanta campaign represents one of the best examples of a prolonged Union invasion deep into southern territory, and, as Hess reveals, it marked another important transition in the conduct of war from open field battles to fighting from improvised field fortifications.

These engagements took place on topography ranging from Appalachian foothills to the clay fields of Georgia's piedmont. Leading military historian Earl J. With 160, 000 troops engaged on both sides and hundreds of miles of trenches dug, fortifications became a defining factor in the Atlanta campaign battles.

Fighting for Atlanta: Tactics, Terrain, and Trenches in the Civil War Civil War America #ad - Hess examines how commanders adapted their operations to the physical environment, how the environment in turn affected their movements, and how Civil War armies altered the terrain through the science of field fortification. He also illuminates the impact of fighting and living in ditches for four months on the everyday lives of both Union and Confederate soldiers.

. While the confederates consistently acted on the defensive, digging eighteen lines of earthworks from May to September, the Federals used fieldworks both defensively and offensively.

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Kennesaw Mountain: Sherman, Johnston, and the Atlanta Campaign Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - While fighting his way toward Atlanta, William T. Kennesaw mountain tells the story of an important phase of the Atlanta campaign. Used book in Good Condition. The opposing armies confronted each other from June 19 to July 3, 1864, and Sherman initially tried to outflank the Confederates. Historian Earl J. He gives special attention to the engagement at Kolb's Farm on June 22 and Sherman's assault on June 27.

Hess explains how this battle, with its combination of maneuver and combat, severely tried the patience and endurance of the common soldier and why Johnston's strategy might have been the Confederates' best chance to halt the Federal drive toward Atlanta. A final section explores the Confederate earthworks preserved within the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park.

Kennesaw Mountain: Sherman, Johnston, and the Atlanta Campaign Civil War America #ad - University of North Carolina Press. His men endured heavy rains, sniping, artillery duels, and a fierce battle at Kolb's Farm before Sherman decided to directly attack Johnston's position on June 27. Sherman encountered his biggest roadblock at Kennesaw Mountain, where Joseph E. Johnston's army of Tennessee held a heavily fortified position.

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On to Petersburg: Grant and Lee, June 4-15, 1864

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LSU Press #ad - Having previously covered the campaign in his magisterial volumes on the battle of the Wilderness, Rhea ends this series with a comprehensive account of the last twelve days of the campaign, and Cold Harbor, To the North Anna River, The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern, which concluded with the beginning of the siege of Petersburg.

On to petersburg follows the union army’s movement to the James River, the military response from the Confederates, and the initial assault on Petersburg, which Rhea suggests marked the true end of the Overland Campaign. On to petersburg grant and Lee June 4 15 1864. With on to Petersburg, Gordon C. Beginning his account in the immediate aftermath of grant’s three-day attack on Confederate troops at Cold Harbor, Rhea argues that the Union general’s primary goal was not―as often supposed―to take Richmond, but rather to destroy Lee’s army by closing off its retreat routes and disrupting its supply chains.

On to Petersburg: Grant and Lee, June 4-15, 1864 #ad - Rhea completes his much-lauded history of the Overland Campaign, a series of Civil War battles fought between Generals Ulysses S. While grant struggled at times to communicate strategic objectives to his subordinates and to adapt his army to a faster-paced, more flexible style of warfare, Rhea suggests that the general successfully shifted the military landscape in the Union’s favor.

On the rebel side, lee and his staff predicted rightly that Grant would attempt to cross the James River and lay siege to the Army of Northern Virginia while simultaneously targeting Confederate supply lines. Like the four volumes that preceded it, On to Petersburg represents decades of research and scholarship and will stand as the most authoritative history of the final battles in the campaign.

Grant and Robert E.

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The Real Horse Soldiers: Benjamin Grierson's Epic 1863 Civil War Raid Through Mississippi

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Savas Beatie #ad - Smith’s the real horse soldiers: benjamin Grierson’s Epic 1863 Civil War Raid through Mississippi rectifies this oversight. There were other simultaneous operations to distract Confederate attention from the real threat posed by U. Grant’s Army of the Tennessee. The last serious study was published more than six decades ago.

The daily rides were long, the rest stops short, and the tension high. Ironically, the man who led the raid was a former music teacher who some say disliked horses. Since then other accounts have appeared, but none are deeply researched full-length studies of the raid and its more than substantial and yet often overlooked results.

The Real Horse Soldiers: Benjamin Grierson's Epic 1863 Civil War Raid Through Mississippi #ad - Gen. S. Readers will find it fills a wide void in Civil War literature. Benjamin grierson’s union cavalry thrust through Mississippi is one of the most well-known operations of the Civil War. Smith’s the real horse soldiers captures the high drama and tension of the 1863 horse soldiers in a modern, comprehensive, academic study.

Although the film replicates the raid’s drama and high-stakes gamble, cinematic license chipped away at its accuracy. Based upon years of research and presented in gripping, fast-paced prose, Timothy B.

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Conquered: Why the Army of Tennessee Failed Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - University of North Carolina Press. Johnston, it won few major battles, and John Bell Hood, and many regard its inability to halt steady Union advances into the Confederate heartland as a matter of failed leadership. Drawing from his mastery of the relevant sources, Daniel's book is a thought-provoking reassessment of an army's fate, with important implications for Civil War history and military history writ large.

Daniel offers a far richer interpretation. On to petersburg grant and Lee June 4 15 1864. But under the principal leadership of generals such as Braxton Bragg, Joseph E. Used book in Good Condition. Surpassing previous work that has focused on questions of command structure and the force's fate on the fields of battle, Daniel provides the clearest view to date of the army's inner workings, from top-level command and unit cohesion to the varied experiences of common soldiers and their connections to the home front.

Conquered: Why the Army of Tennessee Failed Civil War America #ad - Operating in the vast and varied trans-Appalachian west, the Army of Tennessee was crucially important to the military fate of the Confederacy. Here, esteemed military historian Larry J.

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Grant Invades Tennessee: The 1862 Battles for Forts Henry and Donelson Modern War Studies Hardcover

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University Press of Kansas #ad - University of North Carolina Press. Grant targeted forts henry and donelson, significantly, and, setting in motion events that would elevate his own status, he penetrated the Confederacy at one of its most vulnerable points, demoralize the Confederate leadership and citizenry, tear the western Confederacy asunder.

Smith gives readers a battlefield view of the fight for Forts Henry and Donelson, as well as a critical wide-angle perspective on their broader meaning in the conduct and outcome of the war. Grant invades tennessee allows us, for the first time, to clearly see how and why. The first comprehensive tactical treatment of these decisive battles, this book completes the trilogy of the Tennessee River campaign that Smith began in Shiloh and Corinth 1862, marking a milestone in Civil War history.

Grant Invades Tennessee: The 1862 Battles for Forts Henry and Donelson Modern War Studies Hardcover #ad - Whether detailing command-level decisions or using eye-witness anecdotes to describe events on the ground, walking readers through maps or pulling back for an assessment of strategy, this finely written work is equally sure on matters of combat and context. Beginning with grant’s decision to bypass the confederates’ better-defended sites on the mississippi, Smith takes readers step-by-step through the battles: the employment of a flotilla of riverine war ships along with infantry and land-based artillery in subduing Fort Henry; the lesser effectiveness of this strategy against Donelson’s much stronger defense, weaponry, and fighting forces; the surprise counteroffensive by the Confederates and the role of their commanders’ incompetence and cowardice in foiling its success.

Though casualties at the two forts fell far short of bloodier Civil War battles to come, the importance of these Union victories transcend battlefield statistics. On to petersburg grant and Lee June 4 15 1864. More to the point, the two battles of early 1862 opened the Tennessee River campaign that would prove critical to the ultimate Union victory in the Mississippi Valley.

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Slaughter at the Chapel: The Battle of Ezra Church, 1864

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University of Oklahoma Press #ad - Eleven troop movement maps by leading civil War cartographer Hal Jespersen complement Ecelbarger’s analysis, detailing terrain and battle maneuvers to give the reader an on-the-ground perspective of the conflict. On to petersburg grant and Lee June 4 15 1864. Used book in Good Condition. University of Oklahoma Press.

His narrative fills in significant facts and facets of the battle that have long gone unexamined, correcting numerous conclusions that historians have reached about key officers’ intentions and actions before, during, and after this critical contest. In an account that refutes and improves upon all other interpretations of the Battle of Ezra Church, noted battle historian Gary Ecelbarger consults extensive records, reports, and personal accounts to deliver a nuanced hour-by-hour overview of how the battle actually unfolded.

Slaughter at the Chapel: The Battle of Ezra Church, 1864 #ad - The battle of ezra church was one of the deadliest engagements in the Atlanta Campaign of the Civil War and continues to be one of the least understood. Nor do those reports acknowledge the flaws—let alone the ultimate failure—of Confederate commander John Bell Hood’s plan to thwart Union general William Tecumseh Sherman’s southward advance.

University of North Carolina Press. Both official and unofficial reports failed to illuminate the true bloodshed of the conflict: one of every three engaged Confederates was killed or wounded, including four generals. With new revelations based on solid primary-source documentation, Slaughter at the Chapel is the most comprehensive treatment of the Battle of Ezra Church yet written, as powerful in its implications as it is compelling in its moment-to-moment details.

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A Campaign of Giants--The Battle for Petersburg: Volume 1: From the Crossing of the James to the Crater Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - Lee squared off for more than nine months in their struggle for Petersburg, the key to the Confederate capital at Richmond. Used book in Good Condition. A week later, Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House. Here A. When lee's desperate breakout attempt failed in March 1865, Grant launched his final offensives that forced the Confederates to abandon the city on April 2, 1865.

Grinding, and ultimately decisive, bloody, the Petersburg Campaign was the Civil War's longest and among its most complex. On to petersburg grant and Lee June 4 15 1864. University of North Carolina Press. Ulysses S. University of Oklahoma Press. With new perspectives on operational and tactical choices by commanders, and the significant role of the United States Colored Troops in the fighting, the experiences of common soldiers and civilians, this book offers essential reading for all those interested in the history of the Civil War.

A Campaign of Giants--The Battle for Petersburg: Volume 1: From the Crossing of the James to the Crater Civil War America #ad - Wilson greene opens his sweeping new three-volume history of the Petersburg Campaign, taking readers from Grant's crossing of the James in mid-June 1864 to the fateful Battle of the Crater on July 30 After failing to bull his way into petersburg, Grant concentrated on isolating the city from its communications with the rest of the surviving Confederacy, stretching Lee's defenses to the breaking point.

Full of fresh insights drawn from military, political, and social history, A Campaign of Giants is destined to be the definitive account of the campaign. Grant and Robert E.

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Meade and Lee After Gettysburg: The Forgotten Final Stage of the Gettysburg Campaign, from Falling Waters to Culpeper Court House, July 14-31, 1863

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Savas Beatie #ad - On to petersburg grant and Lee June 4 15 1864. University of Oklahoma Press. Rather than follow in lee’s wake, however, meade moved south on the east side of the Blue Ridge Mountains in a cat-and-mouse game to outthink his enemy and capture the strategic gaps penetrating the high wooded terrain. Throughout, one thing remains clear: Union soldiers from private to general continued to fear the lethality of Lee’s army.

Meade and lee after gettysburg, letters, newspapers, the first of three volumes on the campaigns waged between the two adversaries from July 14 through the end of 1863, relies on the Official Records, regimental histories, and other sources to provide a day-by-day account of this fascinating high-stakes affair.

Doing so would trap lee in the northern reaches of the Shenandoah Valley and potentially bring about the decisive victory that had eluded Union arms north of the Potomac. The two weeks that followed was a grand chess match with everything at stake—high drama filled with hard marching, cavalry charges, heavy skirmishing, and set-piece fighting that threatened to escalate into a major engagement with the potential to end the war in the Eastern Theater.

Meade and Lee After Gettysburg: The Forgotten Final Stage of the Gettysburg Campaign, from Falling Waters to Culpeper Court House, July 14-31, 1863 #ad - University of North Carolina Press. Winner, from falling waters to culpeper court house, july 14-31, 1863 exposes for civil war readers what has been hiding in plain sight for 150 years: the gettysburg campaign did not end at the banks of the potomac on july 14, 2017, gettysBURG CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE BOOK AWARD"EASTERN THEATER BOOK OF THE YEAR"--CIVIL WAR BOOKS AND AUTHORSJeffrey Hunt’s Meade and Lee After Gettysburg: The Forgotten Final Stage of the Gettysburg Campaign, but deep in central Virginia two weeks later along the line of the Rappahannock.

Contrary to popular belief, once Robert E.

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