Energy Humanities: An Anthology

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Johns Hopkins University Press #ad - Responding to growing public concern about anthropogenic climate change and the unsustainability of the fuels we use to power our modern society, energy humanists highlight the essential contribution that humanistic insights and methods can make to areas of analysis once thought best left to the natural sciences.

In this groundbreaking anthology, Imre Szeman and Dominic Boyer have brought together a carefully curated selection of the best and most influential work in energy humanities. Conway, gabrielle hecht, jennifer wenzel, roy scranton, patricia yaeger, andrew pendakis, jean-françois mouhot, graeme macdonald, timothy mitchell, joseph masco, martin mcquillan, dale jamieson, laura watts, hermann scheer, Adam Dickinson, Michael Watts, Amitav Ghosh, Oliver Kellhammer, Imre Szeman, Stephanie LeMenager, Naomi Oreskes, Amy De’Ath, David Nye, John McGrath, Gökçe Günel, Sheena Wilson, Barry Lord, Pablo Neruda, Karen Pinkus, Pope Francis, Reza Negarestani, Fritz Ertl, Ken Saro-Wiwa, Judy Natal, Timothy Morton, Abdul Rahman Munif, Julia Kasdorf, Cymene Howe, Allan Stoekl, and Marina Zurkow .

Energy Humanities: An Anthology #ad - Arguing that today’s energy and environmental dilemmas are fundamentally problems of ethics, imagination, habits, values, institutions, belief, and power―all traditional areas of expertise of the humanities and humanistic social sciences―the essays and other pieces featured here demonstrate the scale and complexity of the issues the world faces.

Energy humanities is a field of scholarship that, like medical and digital humanities before it, aims to overcome traditional boundaries between the disciplines and between academic and applied research. Their authors offer compelling possibilities for finding our way beyond our current energy dependencies toward a sustainable future.

Contributors include: margaret atwood, paolo bacigalupi, ursula Biemann, Lesley Battler, Una Chaudhuri, Claire Colebrook, Stephen Collis, Dominic Boyer, Warren Cariou, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Italo Calvino, Erik M.

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The Environmental Humanities MIT Press: A Critical Introduction The MIT Press

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MIT Press #ad - A concise overview of this multidisciplinary field, and current research, central issues, presenting key concepts, along with concrete examples and case studies. The emergence of the environmental humanities as an academic discipline early in the twenty-first century reflects the growing conviction that environmental problems cannot be solved by science and technology alone.

. Finally, they examine the theoretical impact of new materialism, feminism, animal studies, postcolonial criticism, and queer ecology on the environmental humanities. They discuss the decoupling of energy use and progress, and point to OECD countries for examples of sustainable development. This book offers a concise overview of this new multidisciplinary field, issues, concrete examples, current research, presenting concepts, and case studies.

The Environmental Humanities MIT Press: A Critical Introduction The MIT Press #ad - Robert emmett and david nye show how humanists, species extinction, can improve our understanding of such environmental problems as global warming, by offering constructive knowledge as well as negative critique, and over-consumption of the earth's resources. They explain the potential for science to do both good and harm, and describe more positive possibilities―alternative practices, examine dark visions of planetary collapse, including localization and degrowth.

Emmett and nye consider a concept of place not synonymous with localism, the risks of ecotourism, and the cultivation of wild areas. They trace the genealogy of environmental humanities from European, and American initiatives, Australian, also showing its cross-pollination by postcolonial and feminist theories.

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A Billion Black Anthropocenes or None Forerunners: Ideas First

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Univ Of Minnesota Press #ad - This is gray literature publishing: where intense thinking, change, and speculation take place in scholarship. Forerunners is a thought-in-process series of breakthrough digital works. Written between fresh ideas and finished books, Forerunners draws on scholarly work initiated in notable blogs, journal articles, conference plenaries, social media, and the synergy of academic exchange.

A Billion Black Anthropocenes or None Forerunners: Ideas First #ad - Yusoff initiates a transdisciplinary conversation between feminist black theory, deep time, geography, materiality, addressing the politics of the Anthropocene within the context of race, and the earth sciences, and the afterlives of geology. Tracing the color line of the anthropocene, A Billion Black Anthropocenes or None examines how the grammar of geology is foundational to establishing the extractive economies of subjective life and the earth under colonialism and slavery.

Rewriting the “origin stories” of the Anthropocene No geology is neutral, writes Kathryn Yusoff.

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After Oil

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Petrocultures Research Group #ad - After oil explores the social, cultural and political changes needed to make possible a full-scale transition from fossil fuels to new forms of energy. Written collectively by participants in the first After Oil School,  After Oil explains why the adoption of renewable, ecologically sustainable energy sources is only the first step of energy transition.

After Oil #ad - Energy plays a critical role in determining the shape, form and character of our daily existence, which is why a genuine shift in our energy usage demands a wholesale transformation of the petrocultures in which we live. After oil provides readers with the resources to make this happen.    .

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The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable Berlin Family Lectures

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University of Chicago Press #ad - Are we deranged? the acclaimed Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh argues that future generations may well think so. The climate crisis asks us to imagine other forms of human existence—a task to which fiction, Ghosh argues, is the best suited of all cultural forms. How else to explain our imaginative failure in the face of global warming? In his first major book of nonfiction since In an Antique Land, Ghosh examines our inability—at the level of literature, history, and politics—to grasp the scale and violence of climate change.

His book serves as a great writer’s summons to confront the most urgent task of our time. This is particularly true of serious literary fiction: hundred-year storms and freakish tornadoes simply feel too improbable for the novel; they are automatically consigned to other genres. In the writing of history, too, the climate crisis has sometimes led to gross simplifications; Ghosh shows that the history of the carbon economy is a tangled global story with many contradictory and counterintuitive elements.

The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable Berlin Family Lectures #ad - . Ghosh ends by suggesting that politics, much like literature, has become a matter of personal moral reckoning rather than an arena of collective action. But to limit fiction and politics to individual moral adventure comes at a great cost. The extreme nature of today’s climate events, Ghosh asserts, make them peculiarly resistant to contemporary modes of thinking and imagining.

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Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil

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Verso #ad - What followed was a Western democracy dependent on an undemocratic Middle East. In this magisterial study, the struggle for democracy, Timothy Mitchell rethinks the history of energy, bringing into his grasp as he does so environmental politics, and the place of the Middle East in the modern world. With the rise of coal power, the producers who oversaw its production acquired the ability to shut down energy systems, a threat they used to build the first mass democracies.

Oil created a denatured political life whose central object – the economy – appeared capable of infinite growth. We now live with the consequences: an impoverished political practice, incapable of addressing the crises that threaten to end the age of carbon democracy – namely, the disappearance of cheap energy and the carbon-fueled collapse of the ecological order.

Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil #ad - Oil offered the west an alternative, and with it came a new form of politics. Does oil wealth lead to political poverty? It often looks that way, but Carbon Democracy tells a more complex story. Verso.

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Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime

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Polity #ad - Hence their flight offshore and their massive investment in climate change denial. The left has been slow to turn its attention to this new situation. This could explain the deadly cocktail of exploding inequalities, massive deregulation, and conversion of the dream of globalization into a nightmare for most people.

What holds these three phenomena together is the conviction, shared by some powerful people, that the ecological threat is real and that the only way for them to survive is to abandon any pretense at sharing a common future with the rest of the world. Verso. It is still organized along an axis that goes from investment in local values to the hope of globalization and just at the time when, everywhere, people dissatisfied with the ideal of modernity are turning back to the protection of national or even ethnic borders.

Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime #ad - This is why it is urgent to shift sideways and to define politics as what leads toward the Earth and not toward the global or the national. The present ecological mutation has organized the whole political landscape for the last thirty years. Belonging to a territory is the phenomenon most in need of rethinking and careful redescription; learning new ways to inhabit the Earth is our biggest challenge.

. Bringing us down to earth is the task of politics today.

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Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet: Ghosts and Monsters of the Anthropocene

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Univ Of Minnesota Press #ad - Gilbert, swarthmore College; Deborah M. Gordon, stanford U; Donna J. Haraway, santa cruz; andreas hejnol, U of California, U of Bergen, Norway; Ursula K. Ghosts and monsters are tentacular, and arboreal arts that invite readers to encounter ants, lichen, rocks, graves, chestnut trees, electrons, border zones, radioactive waste—in short, windy, mud volcanoes, salmon, flying foxes, the wonders and terrors of an unintended epoch.

Contributors: karen barad, santa cruz; kate brown, santa cruz; Peter Funch, U of California, Baltimore; Carla Freccero, U of California, U of Maryland, Aarhus U; Scott F. Le guin; marianne elisabeth lien, u of california, u of Oslo; Andrew Mathews, U of Hawaii, Santa Cruz; Margaret McFall-Ngai, Manoa; Ingrid M.

Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet: Ghosts and Monsters of the Anthropocene #ad - Parker, sydney; dorion sagan; lesley stern, u of california, santa cruz; mary louise pratt, U of Wisconsin, U of California, NYU; Anne Pringle, Madison; Deborah Bird Rose, San Diego; Jens-Christian Svenning, U of New South Wales, Aarhus U. Verso. This timely anthology calls on twenty eminent humanists and scientists to revitalize curiosity, observation, and transdisciplinary conversation about life on earth.

As human-induced environmental change threatens multispecies livability, Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet puts forward a bold proposal: entangled histories, situated narratives, and thick descriptions offer urgent “arts of living. Included are essays by scholars in anthropology, literature, science studies, ecology, art, and bioinformatics who posit critical and creative tools for collaborative survival in a more-than-human Anthropocene.

The essays are organized around two key figures that also serve as the publication’s two openings: Ghosts, or landscapes haunted by the violences of modernity; and Monsters, or interspecies and intraspecies sociality.

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Medical Humanities: An Introduction

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Cambridge University Press #ad - This textbook brings the humanities to students in order to evoke the humanity of students. Using concepts and methods of the humanities, the book addresses undergraduate and premed students, and students in other health professions, medical students, as well as physicians and other healthcare practitioners.

Medical Humanities: An Introduction #ad - It encourages them to consider the ethical and existential issues related to the experience of disease, care of the dying, health policy, religion and health, and medical technology. It helps to form individuals who take charge of their own minds, who are free from narrow and unreflective forms of thought, and who act compassionately in their public and professional worlds.

Case studies, and analytical aspects of the material, interpretive, and role-playing exercises help readers to engage in the practical, images, questions for discussion, developing skills for critical thinking as well as compassionate care. Verso.

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Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor

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Harvard University Press #ad - Slow violence, exacerbates the vulnerability of ecosystems and of people who are poor, and often involuntarily displaced, disempowered, because it is so readily ignored by a hard-charging capitalism, while fueling social conflicts that arise from desperation as life-sustaining conditions erode. In a book of extraordinary scope, Nixon examines a cluster of writer-activists affiliated with the environmentalism of the poor in the global South.

Verso. Using the innovative concept of "slow violence" to describe these threats, in contrast with the sensational, Rob Nixon focuses on the inattention we have paid to the attritional lethality of many environmental crises, spectacle-driven messaging that impels public activism today. By approaching environmental justice literature from this transnational perspective, he exposes the limitations of the national and local frames that dominate environmental writing.

Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor #ad - . The violence wrought by climate change, deforestation, oil spills, toxic drift, and the environmental aftermath of war takes place gradually and often invisibly. Slow violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor. And by skillfully illuminating the strategies these writer-activists deploy to give dramatic visibility to environmental emergencies, Nixon invites his readers to engage with some of the most pressing challenges of our time.

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The Uninhabitable Earth: A Story of the Future

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Penguin #ad - Slow violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor. Verso. In the meantime, it will remake us, transforming every aspect of the way we live-the planet no longer nurturing a dream of abundance, but a living nightmare. The slowness of climate change is a fairy tale, perhaps as pernicious as the one that says it isn't happening at all, and if your anxiety about it is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today.

Over the past decades, the term "anthropocene" has climbed into the popular imagination - a name given to the geologic era we live in now, one defined by human intervention in the life of the planet. But however sanguine you might be about the proposition that we have ravaged the natural world, which we surely have, engineering first in ignorance and then in denial a climate system that will now go to war with us for many centuries, it is another thing entirely to consider the possibility that we have only provoked it, perhaps until it destroys us.

The Uninhabitable Earth: A Story of the Future #ad - Sunday times and the new york times bestseller**'an epoch-defining book' matt haig'if you read just one work of non-fiction this year, it should probably be this' David Sexton, Evening StandardIt is worse, much worse, than you think.

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